Friday, August 12, 2016

Night of the Living Dead (1968) Filmbook by John Russo

Here is the exciting in-depth story of a horror classic, told by an insider. John Russo, who co-authored the screenplay for Night of the Living Dead, also wrote the novelization and helped produce and promote the movie. Following that early, enormous success, he has gone on to write, produce and/or direct three more movies and to publish eight more novels. Millions of fright fans know him as the perpetrator of macabre creations such as Midnight, Bloodsisters, The Awakening and Day Care. Night of the Living Dead has been called a fluke, a classic, a gross outrageous money-grabber. It's also been called a symbolic work laden with commentary on the pressures and terror of a ruthless modern society. Whatever it may be, no one can deny its rude, powerful effectiveness. To this day, it continues to draw crowds and to scare the living daylights out of them. The Complete Night of the Living Dead Filmbook is a gold mine full of entertaining, enlightening anecdotes. It includes numerous photographs, many of which have never been published before. Film fans and budding film-makers will enjoy and appreciate this comprehensive, insightful look into the creation of Night of the Living Dead.

Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film, directed by George A. Romero, starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea. It was completed on a $114,000 budget and premiered October 1, 1968. The film became a financial success, grossing $12 million domestically and $18 million internationally. It has been a cult classic ever since. Night of the Living Dead was heavily criticized at its release for its explicit gore. It eventually garnered critical acclaim and has been selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry, as a film deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". The story follows characters Ben (Jones), Barbra (O'Dea), and five others trapped in a rural farmhouse in Western Pennsylvania, which is attacked by a large and growing group of unnamed "living dead" monsters drawing on earlier depictions in popular culture of Ghoul, which has led this type of creature to be referred to most popularly as a zombie. Night of the Living Dead led to five subsequent films between 1978 and 2010, also directed by Romero, and inspired two remakes, the most well-known was released in 1990, which was directed by Tom Savini.

















Ebay: Night of the Living Dead (1968) Filmbook by John Russo - $34.99 (USED)

Dawn of the Dead (1978) Thorn EMI Home Video Poster

In 1968, director George A. Romero brought us Night of the Living Dead. It became the definitive horror film of its time. Eleven years later, he would unleash the most shocking motion picture experience for all times. As modern society is consumed by zombie carnage, four desperate survivors barricade themselves inside a shopping mall to battle the flesh-eating hordes of the undead. This is the ferocious horror classic, featuring landmark gore effects by Tom Savini, that remains one of the most important – and most controversial – horror films in history. Lots of "serious" types look down on zombie movies. That's a shame, because some of them are really first-rate films. Dawn of the Dead, the middle film of George Romero's "dead" trilogy, is a case in point. You want zombies, we got your zombies RIGHT HERE! You want blood? Guts? Flesh eating? Oh boy, does Dawn of the Dead ever deliver! Then it does something really unique - it delivers drama, engaging characters with realistic delimmas, a smartly crafted story, and a heavy dose of dead-on social satire.

Did I mention that it's just flat-out scary as hell, too? One scene in particular, toward the beginning, that still haunts me - twenty some-odd years after I first saw it. The National Guard has been called in to clear a tenament building. In the basement, they find a cage where the dead have been locked away. The simple, unsettling music of Goblin rises on the soundtrack, underscored by a heartbeat-like bass drum. There are the zombies, many in death shrouds, feasting on body parts. Guardsman Peter Washington (Ken Foree) steps into the nightmare with a pistol to dispatch the zombies with bullets to their heads. The whole thing takes on a surreal, hellish texture, like a Bosch painting. Foree's performance is striking - he is truly in the moment, as they say, without a hint of the winking self-awareness we see in other genre flicks. If the dead really started coming back to feed on the living, this is exactly how the world would be like. This is the toll it would exact on people trying to grapple the situation. Dawn of the Dead's primary filming location was at the Monroeville Mall.

In the U.S. Dawn wasn’t available for home viewing until 1983 when Thorn EMI Video released the clamshell cased theatrical version (TV1977) in December, borrowing the official poster book cover graphic, just adding a green logo. It rented well and sold respectably (even at a pricey $59.99). Along with the VHS release, Thorn EMI Video also released a home video movie poster. The home video movie poster was sent rolled to video rental stores in the U.S. to promote Dawn of the Dead on VHS and Beta. Almost like the theater poster, but with a different design and made smaller (25x33) to fit on video rental store walls. The home video movie poster was designed by Bob Michelucci. He also played the Scope Zombie in the movie. This poster is highly sought for by collectors; after the intentional run on VHS, video rental stores would throw away or send the poster back to the video company. Fortunate for you we have one available. I'm not in no means a professional grader, but if I where to grade this poster I would give it a high grade. Please continue to condition.



















Ebay: Dawn of the Dead (1978) Thorn EMI Home Video Poster - $89.99 (USED)

Dawn of the Dead (VHS, 1978)

In 1968, director George A. Romero brought us Night of the Living Dead. It became the definitive horror film of its time. Eleven years later, he would unleash the most shocking motion picture experience for all times. As modern society is consumed by zombie carnage, four desperate survivors barricade themselves inside a shopping mall to battle the flesh-eating hordes of the undead. This is the ferocious horror classic, featuring landmark gore effects by Tom Savini, that remains one of the most important – and most controversial – horror films in history. Lots of "serious" types look down on zombie movies. That's a shame, because some of them are really first-rate films. Dawn of the Dead, the middle film of George Romero's "dead" trilogy, is a case in point. You want zombies, we got your zombies RIGHT HERE! You want blood? Guts? Flesh eating? Oh boy, does Dawn of the Dead ever deliver! Then it does something really unique - it delivers drama, engaging characters with realistic delimmas, a smartly crafted story, and a heavy dose of dead-on social satire.

Did I mention that it's just flat-out scary as hell, too? One scene in particular, toward the beginning, that still haunts me - twenty some-odd years after I first saw it. The National Guard has been called in to clear a tenament building. In the basement, they find a cage where the dead have been locked away. The simple, unsettling music of Goblin rises on the soundtrack, underscored by a heartbeat-like bass drum. There are the zombies, many in death shrouds, feasting on body parts. Guardsman Peter Washington (Ken Foree) steps into the nightmare with a pistol to dispatch the zombies with bullets to their heads. The whole thing takes on a surreal, hellish texture, like a Bosch painting. Foree's performance is striking - he is truly in the moment, as they say, without a hint of the winking self-awareness we see in other genre flicks. If the dead really started coming back to feed on the living, this is exactly how the world would be like. This is the toll it would exact on people trying to grapple the situation. Dawn of the Dead's primary filming location was at the Monroeville Mall.

In the U.S. Dawn wasn’t available for home viewing until 1983 when Thorn EMI Video released the clamshell cased theatrical version (TV1977) in December, borrowing the official poster book cover graphic, just adding a green logo. Although it rented well and sold respectably (even at a pricey $59.99) in early 1984, a small-box commercial version didn’t arrive until summer 1987 as part of the affordable HBO/Cannon Video reissues of early 80’s Thorn EMI videos. Another small box edition, with a darker reprint of the packaging and no stills on the back, came out in 1989 from HBO/Weintraub. A BETA version was only available on Thorn EMI Video (TXB 1977) until 1986. This particular VHS is the more sought for (1st issue original) clamshell VHS distributed by Thorn EMI Video. Presented in Pan and Scan and with a length of 126 minutes this version is the version that George envisioned during the production of the film. This is what George calls the “final version.” In my opinion this is the best version of the film ever released. VHS comes from a private collection.

  

















Ebay: Dawn of the Dead (VHS, 1978) Thorn EMI Video - $29.99 (USED)

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Stephen King's World of Horror (VHS, 1988)

Stephen King has become one of the most popular storytellers in the history of mankind. Now you'll see why, in this private tour through his realm of the macabre, where King mixes his sinister wit with some chilling surprises and startling revelations. Then, you'll feel a nasty grin grow on your face when horror celebrities John Carpenter, Clive Barker and Frank Darabont join in for a tribute to horror movie previews. Included here is a collector's portfolio of the most memorable and most outrageous horror film promotions ever devised. Find out why horror is a necessary evil in your life. A documentary about the works of novelist Stephen King and his influence on popular culture and his impact on horror film and novels. Bring Stephen King home to your screening room in this 45 minute Front Row Video special.

VHS is used inside opened slipcase. Slipcase show signs of minor shelf and storage wear. Slipcase has some light creasing and edge wear. Edge wear notably on the bottom corners. Tape sticker label does have some fading. Tape has been tested and inspected for mold. This is NOT a ex-rental or cut-box. VHS comes from a private collection. Overall great condition. Also as a bonus, your VHS will be professionally shrinkwrapped before being shipped out, using high-grade shrinkwrap. It secures your VHS and gives it a shiny new look. Item will be shipped in a bubble mailer envelope. Smoke free home. See actual scans of item. I accept Paypal. Will usually ship within 1 business day of receiving cleared payment. I will be using USPS First Class Package to ship this item. Package tracking is included.





















Ebay: Stephen King's World of Horror (VHS, 1988) Front Row Video, Inc. - $19.99 (USED)

Christine (VHS, 1983/84)

She was born in Detroit... on an automobile assembly line. But she is no ordinary automobile. Deep within her chassis lives an unholy presence. She is Christine - a red and white 1958 Plymouth Fury whose unique standard equipment includes an evil, indestructible vengeance that will destroy anyone in her way. She seduces 17-year-old Arnie Cunningham (Keith Gordon), who becomes consumed with passion for her sleek, rounded, chrome-laden body. She demands his complete and unquestioned devotion and when outsiders seek to interfere, they become the victims of Christine's horrifying wrath. John Carpenter brings Stephen King's best-selling novel to life in this chilling thriller. Keith Gordon (who has gone on to become a director) gives a wonderfully controlled central performance. Carpenter's atmospheric original score is backed up by a well-chosen collection of rock classics, including George Thorogood's "Bad to the Bone" (the titular character's all-too-apt theme song).

The original American VHS release by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video for video rental in 1984 featured a digitally recorded version of the film and was packaged in a paper cover which featured the poster artwork. It was also a side loader, which means the tape goes inside the box through the side instead of the bottom. A second U.S. VHS printing, distributed by Sony Pictures, was released in 1991 and on June 23, 1994. This is the more sought for (1st issue original) side loader VHS distributed by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video. What makes this particular VHS even more sought for is, it is still sealed. That's right... brand new. It's actually hard to believe this VHS has been sealed for over 30 years. On the left side of the VHS, RCA Home Video logo is stamped/watermarked on the plastic. The only flaw I noticed with this VHS is a tiny hole in the plastic on the front. So, if you are like me... a diehard VHS collector looking to replace that old worn out rental. Look no further. Very rare!




















Ebay: Christine (VHS, 1983/84) RCA/Columbia Pictures - $29.99 (NEW)

The Fog (VHS, 1980/87)

Horror master John Carpenter offers up a triple treat with The Fog: Jamie Lee Curtis, Adrienne Barbeau and Janet Leigh all in the same movie. As if that weren't enough, both John Houseman and Hal Holbrook make appearances, each clearly enjoying the novelty of being in a horror flick. Carpenter wrote the script with producer Debra Hill, his collaborator on Halloween (1978), and the two know their craft. It's a creepy story and a tight script, as in their previous effort, the audience gets to know the main characters a bit before they're put in danger. The movie also has a sly sense of humor: "Things seem to happen to me," says slasher vet Jamie Lee. "I'm bad luck." Barbeau is also obviously having a great time, sinking her teeth into her role as a frightened disc jockey watching the fog roll in from a lighthouse. The Fog offers a few shocks and plenty of good old-fashioned clammy chills. You'll never look at weather systems the same way again.

The Fog opens just before the centennial celebration of the seaside town of Antonio Bay, California. One hundred years ago, the wealthy leper Blake bought the clipper ship Elizabeth Dane and sailed with his people to form a leper colony. However, while sailing through a thick fog, they were deliberately misguided by a campfire onshore, steering the course of the ship toward the light and crashing her against the rocks. While the townsfolk prepare to celebrate, the victims of this heinous crime that the town's founding fathers committed rise from the sea to claim retribution. Under cover of the fog, they carry out their vicious attacks, searching for what is rightly theirs. Although this was essentially a low budget independent film, John Carpenter chose to shoot the movie in anamorphic widescreen Panavision. This decision gave the film a grander feel for the viewer so it didn't seem like a low budget horror film. The Fog was filmed in only 30 days.

The original American VHS release by Embassy Home Entertainment for video rental in 1987 featured a hi-fi/MONO version of the film and was packaged in a paper cover which featured the poster artwork. This release was subsequently followed by a copy which sported the Nelson Entertainment logo on the top front cover. Later, several bargain VHS copies was released. This is the VHS distributed by Nelson Entertainment. What makes this particular VHS sought for is, it is still sealed. That's right... brand new. It's hard to believe that this VHS has been sealed for nearly 30 years. However, there is some rattling when you shake the VHS. It could be only a loose screw or VHS tape could be broke. I wanted to keep it sealed for collectible purposes. On the side of the VHS, New Line Home Video logo is stamped/watermarked on the plastic. So, if you are like me... a diehard VHS collector looking to replace that old worn out rental. Look no further. Rare!




















Ebay: The Fog (VHS, 1980/87) Nelson/Embassy Home Entertainment - $24.99 (NEW)

They Live (VHS, 1988/89)

Horror master John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing) directs this action-packed sci-fi thriller about one man's battle against aliens who are systematically gaining control of the earth. Rugged Roddy Piper stars as the loner who stumbles upon a terrifying discovery: goulish creatures are masquerading as humans while they lull the public into submission through subliminal advertising messages. Only specially made sunglasses make the deadly truth visible. Visionary director John Carpenter creates this world that is not unlike today's society. Glued to the television and void of independent thought, he shows us a human race that resembles cattle in the fields waiting for the farmer's next decision. Suspenseful science-fiction and heart-pounding action highlights this masterfully ironic and startling tale co-starring Keith David and Meg Foster.

This was a beautiful film that carries with it a heavy burden of showing us the truth of our world. While we may giggle and laugh at this "created" society, there are some truths to what Carpenter is showing. He gives us warnings and answers if we choose to listen. I was not expecting such a high caliber of emotion to go into a film like this, and was utterly surprised by the experience. Perhaps it is the packaging, perhaps it is because our culture has not adapted well to the horror/sci-fi genre yet, but everyone should experience this film once. I recommend it for anyone that enjoyed The Matrix and want to see more about the structure of our society. Created well before The Matrix, Carpenter uses aliens to demonstrate the power of the media and the superpowers behind the scenes. This film carries themes that are still relevant today.

The original American VHS release by MCA Home Video for video rental in 1989 featured a digitally recorded version of the film and was packaged in a paper cover which featured the poster artwork. A second U.S. VHS printing, distributed by Goodtimes Video, was released on May 18, 1999. This is the more sought for (1st issue original) VHS distributed by MCA Home Video. What makes this particular VHS even more sought for is, it is still sealed. That's right... brand new. However, on the right side of the VHS there is a cut/tear through the UPC barcode. It could have been done by the store for stock purposes. On the left side of the VHS, MCA Home Video logo is stamped/watermarked on the plastic. So, if you are like me... a diehard VHS collector looking to replace that old worn out rental. Look no further. Rare!





















Ebay: They Live (VHS, 1988/89) MCA Home Video - $34.99 (NEW)

Fright Night (VHS, 1985/86)

Meet Jerry Dandridge. He's sweet, sexy and he likes to sleep in late. You might think he's the perfect neighbor. But, before inviting Jerry in for a nightcap, there's just one thing you should know. Jerry prefers his drinks warm, red and straight from the jugular! It's Fright Night, a horrific howl starring Chris Sarandon as the seductive vampire and William Ragsdale as the frantic teenager struggling to keep Jerry's deadly fangs out of his neck. Only 17-year-old Charley Brewster (Ragsdale) knows Jerry's bloodcurdling secret. When Charley can't get anybody to believe him, he turns to TV horror host Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall), who used to be the "Great Vampire Killer" of the movies. Can these mortals save Charley and his sweetheart Amy (Amanda Bearse) from the wrathful bloodsucker's toothy embrace? If you love being scared, Fright Night...will give you the nightmare of your life.

Fright Night is an 80s vampire flick for the classic horror fanatic. Paying homage to such staples as Dark Shadows and the Hammer Dracula franchise, this surprising little horror film supplies vampire lore and cliches aplenty, put together so skillfully that the result is this horror fan's favorite vampire indulgence. Of course, this favoritism is in no small part due to spectacular effects and performances. The cast seems tailor made for their roles as they play them, even if some choices seem a bit odd superficially. Hard to imagine this vampire pining away over the centuries for Married With Children's Marcy D'Arcy, but Amanda Bearse plays the role of the teenage object of Chris Sarandon's desires to perfection. Chris, himself, is powerfully convincing and menacing as the hip, 80's vampire. Extremely well adjusted to the times, too. The Peter Vincent character was named after horror icons Peter Cushing and Vincent Price.

I've always loved the VHS artwork to Fright Night. I remember looking at it frequently in the video rental store. The original American VHS release by RCA/Columbia Pictures for video rental in 1986 featured a pan-and-scan version of the film and was packaged in a paper cover which featured the poster artwork and sealed with a flap. This release was subsequently followed by a bargain copy which sported a photo of Evil Ed on the front cover. This is the more sought for (1st issue original) VHS distributed by RCA/Columbia Pictures. What makes this particular VHS even more sought for is, it is still sealed. That's right... brand new. It's hard to believe that this VHS has been sealed for 30 years, actually over. The RCA/Columbia Pictures logo is stamped on the plastic on the side and back. Believe it or not. So, if you are like me... a diehard VHS collector looking to replace that old worn out rental. Look no further. Rare!




















Ebay: Fright Night (VHS, 1985/86) RCA/Columbia Pictures - $34.99 (NEW)